The Louisville Juneteenth Festival celebrated its fifth annual edition on Saturday in Louisville's Lynn Family Stadium purple lot.

The Louisville Juneteenth Festival celebrated its fifth annual edition Saturday in Louisville’s Lynn Family Stadium ahead of the federal holiday that marks when slaves in Texas learned they had been freed through President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation.

The event, which has food, vendors and entertainment, will continue until the evening with an after party that follows.

Clean Jai, 11, performed two of her songs at the event. other performers include Monica Hardin, DJ Cyn, Sean Clay & Friends, Marzz and Daria Raymore.

For Tanya Forte, whose 11-year-old daughter Clean Jai performed at the event, it is important for people to understand when the real freedom of African Americans took place.

“I’m glad to see that our city is starting to do things like this for our community so we can know when our actual freedom was because a lot of people think that it’s Fourth of July and it’s really not for the African American culture,” Forte, 35, told The Courier Journal.

Along with Clean Jai, other performers include Monica Hardin, DJ Cyn, Sean Clay & Friends, Marzz and Daria Raymore.

Lynnell Blakemore, 61, did not know about the festival until her husband, who worked at Saturday's soccer game, told her it was happening.

Lynnell Blakemore, 61, did not know about the festival until her husband told her it was happening. There were not many people when she arrived a little after the event started, but she hopes more people come.

“Our people were in bondage longer than they should have been and then, when they were released, they didn’t know anything about it,” Blakemore said. “So, I think … it honors, the ones that were there at that time, you know, to come and celebrate the fact that they were free.”

Although Juneteenth falls on June 19, which is Wednesday this year, Louisville has celebrations throughout June including awards, races and performances.

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The festival caused a social media debate ahead of its celebration due to organizers changing its name to Louteenth, but the name was changed back to Juneteenth shortly after.

More:‘Louteenth’ debacle shows missteps in honoring Black history can be learning opportunities